• Automotive Hats
  • Featured Vehicles

    Article Preview

    Beginning as a 1951 Ford “Shoebox,” this incredible custom creation pays homage to the restyling masters of the past with an awesome modern twist. With a 4-inch chop and shaved handles, the many tweaks include Frenched headlights, taillights, and event the license-plate box. A ’58 Corvette grille and flush-mounted glass bridge the ...
    Article Preview

    Known as HOT ROD 1 and built by Jim Barber of Classic Automotive Restoration Specialist (CARS), who was licensed by HOT ROD magazine, this awesome Dynacorn-bodied 1969 Chevrolet Camaro ZL-1 Convertible was designed by Doug Evans of HOT ROD magazine. Only 69 of these hand-built cars will ever be built, and there ...
    Article Preview

    Conceived and built for just one purpose – to homologate Ford’s wildly successful Mustang for SCCA road-racing competition – Carroll Shelby’s original GT350 exemplified Ford’s “Total Performance” ethos and conferred an unbeatable high-performance image on the trendsetting new “ponycar”. On the track, the GT350 utterly dominated ...
    Article Preview

    Beginning with the Mustang’s first redesign for 1967, Shelby American transplanted a mildly modified Police Interceptor 428 to create the new GT500, but the hot new 428 Cobra Jet upped the ante from 1968 through the final 1969/1970 GT500 series. The Cobra Jet, originally developed by Tasca Ford at the urging of Hot Rod magazine Technical Editor Eric Dahlquist, included a pair of 427 low-riser cylinder heads, a 735-cfm Holley carburetor, and many subtle improvements lurking within Ford’s massive high-performance parts inventory.

    A fleet of six Cobra Jet-powered Mustangs were race-prepped by Holman-Moody-Stroppe in Long Beach, California for an all-out Ford assault on the 1968 NHRA Winternationals at Pomona, California. There, they dominated Super Stock competition and the CJ proved itself a strong and reliable performer with immense torque output. When the smoke cleared, Al Joniec and his CJ Mustang took both class and Super Stock Eliminator wins. On the street, the 428 CJ developed a fearsome reputation and extended Ford’s Total Performance mantra even further by powering a number of Ford performance cars, including Shelby’s increasingly upscale GT500 through 1970. ...
    Article Preview

    Over 3,000 hours of craftsmanship produced this stunning custom 1957 Chevy Bel Air “SS” Roadster. Featured by Eaton at the 2009 SEMA show, this vehicle features a 550 hp supercharged Gen 3 LS1 crate motor complemented by a Comp Cams valvetrain including lifters, pushrods, and rockers. ...
    Article Preview

    Without a doubt, this 1948 Ford Woodie is one of the country’s finest. Fresh with less then 1,500 miles since completion, it is ready to cruise and show. Built by renowned Woodie expert "Teddy Z" from Romulus, Michigan over two and half years, it features superior wood throughout with meticulous attention ...
    Article Preview

    This over-the-top 1940 Chevrolet Pickup is a one-of-a-kind custom dubbed, El Chueco, loosely translated: The Twisted.

    The name is apt, with a wildly customized Old School aesthetic and big performance. The truck is powered by a 1968 Cadillac 472 and backed by a TH400 transmission driving a 10-bolt rear end. The engine was factory rated by Cadillac at 375 HP and 525lb-ft, and it is further upgraded here with a medium rise intake manifold, custom headers, and Edelbrock carburetor.

    The bodywork boasts custom bright blue metal flake paint with hand-done flames and pinstriping, shaved handles, mirrors and bumpers, and it features a custom nose with open engine bay, which is fully matched to the rest of the truck right down to the pinstriped Cadillac air cleaner and color-matched engine block. The customized bed houses a stainless fuel tank and sits on a bespoke, box section rear frame. The front end received the classic hot rod treatment with dropped spindles, disc brakes and inverted leaf spring, while the rear suspension is upgraded with coil springs and adjustable air shocks. ...
    Article Preview

    Steve Saleen made his reputation in the mid-1980s by taking Ford’s Mustang and transforming the meek pony car – its so-called High Output engine in 1984 was rated at 175 HP – with re-engineered aerodynamics, suspension and steering. Saleen quickly proved that his creation was not simply a fluffed-up road car when he took the trophy at the grueling 24-hour race at Mosport, Canada. After years of planning, in 2000 Saleen announced his entry into the world of production supercars with the S7. A collaboration between Saleen, designer Phil Frank and Ray Mallock Engineering, the S7 was the car that established Saleen as an independent automotive manufacturer of both road and race cars. The tunnel-tested carbon fiber body designed by Frank features a long tail that assists in creating tremendous downforce, channelling air from the twin front radiators over internal wings to the “gills” below the doors; a massive rear diffuser works with the S7’s rear spoiler to plant the car on the road all the way up to its 200-plus MPH top speed. Getting there requires horsepower, and that’s where the S7’s 427 CI engine comes into play, delivering 550 HP and 525 lb-ft of torque and a redline of 6,500 RPM using components specially machined in-house. A totally new all-aluminum version of that powerplant, built to the original specifications, powers this shining example of Saleen’s limited production, hand built, American-made supercar. Built in 2003 and now with 6,702 miles on the odometer, the car is in pristine mechanical and cosmetic condition. Iridescent Candy Red paint, exclusive polished aluminum Saleen wheels and a cocoon-like Tan leather cockpit highlight this arresting machine’s many qualities. ESTIMATE: $300,000 - $350,000 ...
    Article Preview

    Vehicle to be offered for Auction sale June 20th-22nd at Russo and Steele's inaugural Newport Beach, California Auction. Please contact us for more information.

    Now offered from 25 years of single ownership and quite possibly the finest Willys Coupe available anywhere, this highly rare ...
    Article Preview

    This historically significant pickup was once owned by actor Steve McQueen and brought to life by designer and motoring visionary Vic Hickey, who helped create important vehicles such as the Chevrolet Blazer, the Humvee, the Lunar Rover and the legendary Baja Boot. This 1969 off-road race truck was a continuation of Hickey’s design prowess. It has a C10 chassis with a C30 one-ton cab. The vehicle made its debut in the inaugural Baja 1000 in 1968. Over ...
    Article Preview

    Having served years of duty as a tow truck/wrecker before its retirement, this 1936 Ford Model 51 truck was purchased from its second owner, who had kept it stored in his barn since 1948. Fortunately for lovers of these pioneering workhorses, it was then made the subject of a museum quality restoration that was completed in 2009 to the tune of approximately $125,000. The results speak for themselves. Every component has been rebuilt to look and function as new, including the specialized rear body and fully operative towing rig originally built by the Fischer Crane Company of Bolingbrook, Illinois.
    ...
    Article Preview

    Fans of the Touchstone Pictures 2000 remake of the 1974 cult movie "Gone in 60 Seconds" will recognize this as the original Eleanor, the modified 1967 Ford Mustang piloted by retired master car thief Memphis Raines, played by Nicholas Cage. Several cars were built to handle various duties during the filming of Gone, but this is serial number 7R02C179710, the “Hero” car driven by Cage during filming and used in movie close-ups, posters and promotional materials, in the process launching a whole new trend in Resto Modding.

    Built by Cinema Vehicle Services (CVS), the design of the car is a work of art, literally. Well-known hot rod designer Steve Stanford sketched out the original concept drawing for the car before the vehicle was brought to life by CVS. The builders were able to mock up Eleanor's body pieces on a Mustang using clay and wood. Molds were then made to produce a new fiberglass front end filled with high-powered PIAA driving lights, new fender flares, side skirts and scoops, hood and trunk lid. The front suspension was replaced with a lowered and reinforced coilover spring arrangement with power rack and pinion steering; 4-wheel disc brakes were installed and Goodyear Eagle F1 tires mounted on Schmidt 8x17-inch Cobra-style wheels.
    ...

    Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast