• Brake Tech

      by Published on 11-14-2011 11:22 AM  Number of Views: 3534 
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      Finally a disc brake system that is a true bolt-on. This kits includes everything shown in the photo, plus a set of our conversion brake OM brake lines. Kit shown with a 9" single diaphragm booster but you can choose any size single diaphragm booster, shown on pages 223-225. Stock spindle kit shown; drop spindle kit varies a little. Includes drop spindles instead of caliper brackets.
      Note: Drop spindles lower the center of gravity while maintaining the full suspension travel. This will drastically improve the ride, braking, steering and handling.




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      When you think about upgrading to disc brakes on a Chevy Muscle Car you probably think that it’s a difficult job that should be left up to a professional shop. In the past that would of been the case. Most upgrades required changing spindles, ball joints, custom machine work and a host of modifications that move your wheels out, negatively affecting the steering geometry, causing your new tires to rub your freshly painted fenders. But things have changed. Today, companies like Classic Performance Inc. manufacture kits that are considered easy “bolt-on” kits. An excellent example of this is CPP’s Super Street Kit, a high performance disc brake system designed for all the popular early Chevy midsize cars. Let’s take a look inside the box of a Super Street Kit and read the instructions. I think you will see these kits are very simple to install and require just basic hand tools, something any gearhead can handle.

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      When setting up a brake system, it is very important to use the correct valves. If the master cylinder reservoir is located lower than the wheel cylinders or calipers then you should have residual pressure valves. Use a 2psi valve for disk brake calipers and 10psi valve for drum brake wheel cylinders. This will maintain 2 or 10psi between the caliper/wheel cylinder and valve, which is enough pressure to keep the brake fluid from flowing back from the wheels and leaking past the reservoir vent and on to the ground. The second function of the residual pressure is a slight preload on the brakes keeping them “at the ready.”






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